Jun 01

Electronics Out There

And we're back. This is a post of things for me to look at/emulate in the coming years as I go forth in the DIY community.

DIY.org is a website for kids to "make themselves into makers." It's a site where kids can earn patches for completing projects to learn skills and share their projects with other kids. I think it's a great way to teach kids things they'd never learn about another way and to give kids a sense that they can learn new things and forge their own path. They have a great video about the website called Fearless Kids.

Two Bit Circus is a steam punk circus designed to teach kids about STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math). They are almost done with their kickstarter campaign. Hooray STEAM education! They also reach out to underprivileged students, which I think is awesome.

Peter Diamandis wrote an article about cutting costs when he made his company DIY drones. He talks about how he got people to help him build drones who he never could have paid because they wanted to solve those problems. I can try to replicate that by solving a problem that I want solved and will make efforts to solve even if nothing comes out of it.

There is an article in Open Electronics about documenting your work. The main point is that by documenting what you make, you can share it with people and potentially get in contact with people who build it too or want to work with you on the project. Networking to build a team and get more done than an individual can help create great projects.

There is an article in the EE Times about a $69 arduino board to plug people into the cloud. Nice.

MIT news posted about Ladyada, and it said some inspiring things about how she started doing what she loved and made a business out of it. If she can do it, then why not other people as well? Adafruit is a great company and a leader in the Maker movement.

Lifehacker had an article about getting started with DIY electronics. It goes over some of the basics, but it mostly made me realize how there isn't a structured path to learning this. Even a guide that is supposed to provide a path leads people to the internet, where hackers have been roaming towards whatever ignites their passion. I hopefully can help add yet another path to the tangle.