Oct 23

FTDI chips, a CNC Mill, Micro Arduinos and Hardware Confessions

Ok, I changed the order. But still. Here's some goings on in the outside world for inspiration.

The FTDI FT232 is (I guess) a very popular USB to serial converter. There's an article here about how windows made a driver to brick fake chips. Fun way to stop hackers, set their chips to "don't work."

This article is just titled like a hilarious joke from the past. It's called "What is This, A Microcontroller Board for Ants?" (Yep, Zoolander). It's about an ATiny85 board where the board is slightly bigger than the chip. Kudos for saving space (if I need a small arduino, I know where to go).

There is a MakerBot equivalent for a CNC machine. It's called Carvey. Article is here.

There is also a confessions of a hardware startup page. I haven't actually read it, so I do not condone what is said there. I will read it later and find it by posting it on my blog.

Oct 19

Updates in the world of Open Source Laser Tag

To quote GLaDOS, "It's been a long time."

While I've been away, there have been plenty of things going on in the world of open source, laser tag, etc. A quick google search showed me some recent developments that look exciting.

Skirmos is an open source laser tag game made by college students. It is based on the arduino, uses IR LED's to send tags (with a range of 500 feet according to their kickstarter page), X-bee radios to sync data, tricolor LED's for coloring the tag unit, has a screen (which seems to be their differentiator), and has a cool shell. Since it uses an arduino, it is hack-tastic for other arduino enthusiasts. I missed the initial kickstater, and will have to follow up with this in the future. Based on their website and kickstarter goals, the final product may not have all of the functionality that they state in their kickstarter video. But hey, they are building something cool, and I am supportive of building cool things.

The guys at Skirmos mention that they are working with Kevin Darrah. He's another person who has a tutorial for using those silly NRF24L01+ radios (and I say that they are silly because, while I have read their data sheet and understand how one could control them, I haven't spent the time to write a library for controlling them and don't want to. I want a free one that I can use for whatever I want. Including teaching children how to build laser tag). Kevin has a website here with some cool projects relating to LED cubes (shift registers, multiplexing, etc.) and some home automation stuff with the aforementioned radios (which turns out are really cheap on ebay). He also made a breakout board for those things. Because who wants to solder 8 pins every time they use one?

IBM developerWorks has a three part tutorial on building laser tag. Who knew? I had some trouble navigating from part 1 to part 2 (there wasn't a link from part 1 to part 2 that I found faster than googling for part 2, so I'm posting the links to all 3 parts). I may have to look at developerWorks from IBM for more cool projects.
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3