Dec 27

Sunrise Alarm Clock, Part 2

Welcome back. After designing the circuit using adafruit's lovely tutorials, the next step is to build it. I have attached a photo of what the circuit looks like in real life. A few points about why I chose to do certain things.

1. Wire Colors: Using different colors for different wires makes building your circuit and looking for problems much easier. I would suggest using differently colored wires for specific purposes. That way, when you look at your board, you know what wires are supposed to go where and can more easily identify problems. Here is the color scheme that I am using:
Red: I always use red wire for 5 Volt power. If it's red, I know that it's a 5V signal.
Brown: Brown wire is my 12 Volt power coming from my 12 Volt power supply.
Black: I normally use black wire for ground. In this case, I am not using negative voltage, so all black wires are ground.
White: I usually use white wire to transmit signals from the arduino and for my resonator.
Yellow/Green/Blue: This is a generic color for transmitting signals. Normally, as long as two adjacent signal wires are different colors, then it's ok. Normally, I use wires in (sort of) the following order: White/Yellow/Green/Blue. For this project, I chose green, yellow and blue to transmit the signals to my TIP120's so that I know what wires are going out to control each part of the RGB LED's. I can't use red as a signal wire, because I only use red for 5 Volt power.
Note: I didn't show the input power and the wires going to the RGB LED's in the picture below. There are, however, wires sticking up where I will put the RGB wires. The input power is unmarked, but has a brown wire on it already to remind me where it goes.

2. Resistors: I used 10 kOhm (10,000 Ohm) resistors for my button, and 1 kOhm (1,000 Ohm) resistors for my TIP120's. I do not need very much current for buttons, and the TIP120's do not need very much current to turn them on.

3. Capacitors: I used two capacitors for my voltage regulator. This helps to smooth out voltage spikes, which will occur as I turn the LED's off and on quickly. I used the capacitors that I had sitting around. Normally, I use the circuit described in Make: Electronics by O'Reilly. That has a 0.33 microFarad electrolytic capacitor on the input voltage and a 0.1 microFarad ceramic capacitor. If you are interested in learning about the basics of hardware, that is a great book to pick up. The capacitors I had were a little bigger, but it should work fine.

Sunrise Alarm Clock Breadboarded

Dec 17

Building a Sunrise Alarm Clock, 1

Sunrise Alarm Clock: 1

Have you ever woken up at 5:30 am to the most annoying sound on the planet? Yes, the sound that strikes fear in the most peaceful sleeper. The alarm clock sound. That dream crushing sound that jerks you back into reality. If only there was a smoother transition, one where I didn't wake up feeling angry that I was from my dreamscape so ungraciously taken. Enter the sunrise alarm clock.

Bill of Materials:

1. Arduino compatible (bare bones support for Atmega328p)

2. 12V 5A power supply (adafruit part number 352)

3. RGB LED strip (60 LED, adafruit 346)

4. TIP120 x3 (adafruit 976)

5. DS1307 Real Time Clock breakout board (adafruit 264)

Yes, I got a way beefier power supply than I needed. I could power a laptop off that thing. But then again, if I ever want more LED's, a motor, or a solenoid (hey, maybe I want my alarm clock to shoot socks at me in the morning out of my sock cannon? That'll wake me up.).

So, what is all this stuff and what does it do? Together, they make a sunrise alarm clock.

Adafruit has a lovely tutorial on hooking up the RGB LED strip here.

Adafruit has a wonderful tutorial on using the DS1307 real time clock here.

I'm using three PWM pins, 9, 10 and 11. 9 is connected to the green part of the RGB LED, 10 is red, and 11 is blue (see schematic). A diagram of what pins are what for the Atmega chip is shown on the arduino website: Atmega328 pin mapping.

If you follow the above Adafruit links, you will find everything you'd want to know on the parts. Now I need to wire it, code it, and test it.

Mar 21

The terror of the Snooze Button

Lifehacker posted a video today by ASAP Science (they have a Youtube channel) about how the snooze button doesn't help you get any more sleep and can actually make you more tired. This adds to my convictions that the alarm clock that I make will not have a snooze button. It will wake me up, whether I want it to or not. And as the saying goes, "The me in the morning will have no respect for the me that set the alarm."

Mar 13

Example of a Sunrise Alarm Clock

One of the projects that I'm interested in building is an alarm clock with a variety of alarms to wake a person up. I've though of using LEDs to simulate sunlight, a motor to vibrate my pillow, a speaker to play music, a squirt gun, a spring-loaded mechanism to pull off my sheets, etc. I haven't built one yet, but the project has always been in the back of my head. I cam across a series of alarm clocks that simulate sunrise, and I like the one in the link below, particularly for its great bill of materials. I would use an arduino instead of the Arm processor because I have a few ATMega328p's I haven't found projects for. He also uses all open source products to create the project, which I think is awesome. I haven't dabbled in board layout much, and an open source program would be a great place for me to start.

Sunrise Alarm Clock

Dangerous Prototypes has a sunrise alarm clock that uses a PIC32. I've used one for another class, but since I'm focusing on ease of teachability, for now I'm going to stick with the arduino (very beginner friendly). This one plays sounds back, which is nice, but I can do that with an arduino as well.